Location

Crossley Gallery

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Date

December 4th 2021 - January 24th 2022
Ongoing...

Cost

Free

Alan Gummerson (1928-2020): A Life in Pieces

Alan Gummerson revelled in textures, in words, in ceramics, in bodies, in flags, in brass, in re-purposed utensils, in etchings, in charcoal, in paint, in muddy colours, in fabrics, in bright colours, in scrap paper, in humour, in weapons of war, in Evo-Stik, in wood, in friends, in string… in life.

Born in Bradford Moor in 1928, Alan attended what was then Bradford Regional College of Art and Craft from 1945 to 1947. He went on to teach at Leeds College of Art from 1957 until he retired in 1984.

After spending much of his working life in Calverley, Alan moved to a farmhouse in Blackshawhead where he held life-drawing and other lessons besides concentrating on his own work.

Alan exhibited in the USA and across the UK and Europe. He had solo shows in Paris, Berlin, London, Cambridge, Leeds, Harrogate, and Rievaulx Abbey.

He was notably supported by local galleries such as South Square in Thornton and Halifax’s Bankfield Museum (where many of the remarkable WW1 assemblages were first shown).

In 2011 Alan was interviewed by Bradford’s Telegraph and Argus for his retrospective at the Dean Clough Galleries, when he was quoted as saying: “All my work is bolstered by family and amazing friends: not that they should be held responsible for my continued urge to make art nor for my inadequacies.

“And as for the inadequacies, they are an essential part of the results. Life would seem empty without the making.”

Alan died in November 2020 after a lengthy period of convalescence in which his family and friends proved how amazing they truly were. Besides being held in numerous private collections across Europe, examples of Alan’s work can be seen in the municipal collections of Kirklees and of Harrogate.

 

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